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Florida Weather: Hurricanes

   
Hurricane Season: June 1 to November 30
August & September are peak months.

 

Hurricane Information & Links

Hurricane Science

History

Research

  • Hurricane Research Division
    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory hurricane research aims to improve forecasts and advance the basic physical understanding of hurricanes and tropical meteorology

Hurricane Terms

  • Advisory: Hurricane and storm information is disseminated to the public every six hours.
  • Special Advisory: Information is disseminated when there is significant change in storm-related weather conditions.
  • Gale Warning: Sustained winds of 35-54 mph and strong wave action are expected.
  • Storm Warning: Sustained winds of 55-73 mph are expected.
  • Hurricane Watch: There is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours.
  • Hurricane Warning: A hurricane is expected to strike within 24 hours or less, with sustained winds of 74 mph or more and dangerously high water.
  • Tropical Disturbance: A moving area of thunderstorms is in the tropics.
  • Storm Surge - National Weather Service

 

Hurricane Categories
Saffir-Simpson
Hurricane Scale

Category

Winds
mph
Surge
ft
Depression <39 --
T. Storm 39-73 --
Hurricane 1 74-95 4-5
Hurricane 2 96-110 6-8
Hurricane 3 111-130 9-12
Hurricane 4 131-155 13-18
Hurricane 5 > 155 > 18

Source: National Weather Service
Click Here for More Info

A storm is named when it reaches tropical storm strength with winds of 39 mph

Hurricane Names Atlantic
Currently 6 lists of names are in rotation.

2006 2007
Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
Andrea
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
 

Bold names are the hurricanes that hit Florida and are now retired names.

2004 2005
Alex
Bonnie
Charley
Danielle
Earl
Frances
Gaston
Hermine
Ivan
Jeanne
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Dennis
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katrina
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rita
Stan
Tammy
Vince
Wilma
Alpha
 
Source: National Weather Service
Click Here for more info

 

Danger & Power of Hurricanes

One of the most dramatic, damaging and potentially damaging weather events that occur in this country is a hurricane. Fortunately, there are measures that can be taken by individuals and communities before a hurricane strikes to reduce vulnerability to hurricane hazards.

During a hurricane, homes, businesses, public buildings, roads and power lines may be damaged or destroyed by high winds and floodwaters. Debris can break windows and doors. Roads and bridges can be washed away by flash flooding or blocked by debris.

The force of wind alone can cause tremendous devastation, toppling trees and power lines and undermining weak areas of buildings.

These storms cost our nation millions, if not billions, of dollars in damage annually.
But there are ways to offset such destruction. Simple construction measures, such as placing storm shutters over exposed glass or installing hurricane straps on roofs, have proved effective in lessening damage when hurricanes strike.

Communities can reduce vulnerability to hurricanes by adopting and enforcing building codes for wind and flood resistance. Sound land-use planning also can ensure that structures are not built in high-hazard areas.

A goal of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security/FEMA is to help prevent future damage from disasters by providing information as well as direct, hands-on help when needed. Building disaster-resistant communities is an achievable goal. It requires action by individuals, businesses and local governments. Working together, we can reduce the number of lives, property and businesses lost the next time a hurricane strikes.

THE POWER OF HURRICANES

Walls torn from concrete buildings, 15-foot trees ripped from the earth, 20-foot waves crashing to shore. The power of hurricanes is awesome.

Hurricanes can spawn tornadoes. Floods and flash floods are generated by torrential rains that accompany hurricanes. Even more dangerous is the storm surge -- a dome of ocean water that, at its peak, can be 25 feet high and 50-100 miles wide. The surge can devastate coastal communities as it sweeps ashore.

A hurricane is a tropical weather system with winds that have reached a sustained speed of 74 mph or more. Hurricane winds blow in a large spiral around a relatively calm center, known as the "eye." The eye is generally 20-30 miles wide, and the storm may extend outward from it for 400 miles.

As a hurricane approaches, the sky darkens and winds strengthen. As it nears land, it can bring torrential rains, high winds and storm surges. A hurricane can stretch the entire length of the eastern seaboard. The 74-160 mph winds can extend inland for hundreds of miles.

See Also: Preparation & Safety (Before & After the Storm)

References:

  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency
 Featured Sites

 

 

 

 


Hurricane Wilma 2005


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