City of Homestead, Florida

Homestead is a city south of Miami. It is mainly considered a suburb of Miami, but its proximity to the city, the Florida Keys, and the Everglades makes it an ideally located area for exploring everything South Florida has to offer. It has many parks, museums, and sports complexes for visitors to enjoy while staying here.

Welcome to the country's largest subtropical wilderness! The biodiversity at the Everglades National Park is truly unfathomable and must be experienced first hand. It serves as home to many endangered species such as the American crocodile, manatee, American alligator, sea turtles, birds, Florida panther, and many types of plants. If you are eager to learn and experience the wildlife in a way that you will never forget, this is the place for you. They have ranger programs, tours, books, and many other activities to educate visitors on topics related to the different species and their environment. If you become an expert, you could even volunteer in aiding their conservation efforts. 

everglades national park
Website Listings

Discover the mysteries of the Everglades at South Florida's oldest alligator farm. Near the main entrance of Everglades National Park, Everglades Alligator Farm contains more than 2,000 alligators! Glide across the everglades on one of our guided airboat tours. Alligator, snake, and wildlife shows are performed hourly.

Schnebly Redland's Winery wine is only made out of the best fruits available such as mango, guava, passion fruit, and lychee. Sustainable farming is a top priority for this family owned winery and wanted to bring this to their hometown.

St. John’s Episcopal School is committed to being a school of academic excellence where children experience a loving, nurturing environment within a Christian setting.

Invasive species in Florida
The Dangers Posed by Florida’s Invasive Snake, The Burmese Python
The Burmese Python is an invasive species that has thrived in South Florida. Their presence has drastically changed the biodiversity in the Everglades within just a few short decades, and there is now more reason to try and control their population.
Eddy Cespedes