Wakulla County

Wakulla County is located in Northwest Florida in the Panhandle bordering the Gulf of Mexico and Franklin, Liberty, Leon, and Jefferson Counties. 

Wakulla County was established from a portion of Leon County in 1843. Wakulla, also the name of an enormous spring and river in the county, is probably of Indian derivation. It may contain the word kala, meaning "spring of water" in some Indian dialects or wahkola, meaning "loon" in Hitchiti, a language of the Creek Indians. 

Wakulla County Florida Image Map
Population - 2000
22,863
Population - 2010
30,776
Population - 2015 Est
31,283
Land Area (sq mi)
606
Water Area (sq mi)
129
Total Area (sq mi)
736
Average Rainfall
54
Temperature - Average High
85
Temperature - Average Low
54

Located in Crawfordville, Florida, the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park is the perfect destination for anyone craving a weekend getaway. With a variety of activities that range from swimming, hiking, snorkeling, horseback riding, and kayaking, one is sure to find an activity that the entire family can enjoy. There is a camping ground where one can set up a tent to enjoy the wildlife scenery during the day and stargaze by night. If outside camping isn’t your thing, then worry not. A lodge is offered at the property so that one can enjoy nature while still feeling at home.

Welcome to Ochlockonee River State Park! A great place to spend a day, weekend, or week long vacation. Enjoy fishing in the park's river for both freshwater and saltwater fish such as bream, largemouth bass, and catfish. The boat ramp allows easy access to the water for anyone who wants to canoe or kayak. Picnic and swimming areas are available for visitors at the intersection of the Ochlockonee River and the Dead River. Blissfully hike through the trails and marvel at the various wildlife families that live there. For visitors who plan on staying the night, full access to campgrounds with restrooms and showers are available. 

San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park is boasted for its rich history. Its museum has displays for some of the tools unearthed beside the fort, as well as a self-guided interpretive exhibits through the park. There are picnic pavilions and grills available overlooking the Wakulla River and Apalache Bay from Tucker's Point, where fresh and salt water come together. It has become an excellent fishing spot for anglers! Come learn about this historic site and take a walk on one of the nature trails that are just waiting to be explored.

This beautiful and historic 16-mile stretch of converted railway connects Florida's capital to the Gulf of Mexico. The paved trail provides an amazing scenic experience for running, walking, biking, and skating. Equestrian riders can also enjoy the adjacent unpaved trail. Along the path you will encounter all kinds of wildlife such as beautiful cypress trees, butterflies, wading birds, and on occasion alligators and manatees. 

St. Marks Historic State Trail is also pet friendly and provides many great locations for picnics with multiple pavilions and playgrounds for families to enjoy. 

At the southern entrance of the trail, the coastal city of St. Marks welcomes hikers to enjoy seafood dining, fishing, and entertainment. The northern entrance connects hikers to trails leading directly to Apalachicola National Forest to experience even more relaxing scenery and wildlife.

Wakulla County School District presides over a large rural community in the panhandle of Florida. One of the elementary schools in the area has been renovated into the Sopchoppy Education Center, a second chance school.

Website Listings

The Wakulla News delivers news focusing on issues that are important to Wakulla County residents featuring news, community interest stories, and local sports coverage.

Try a little bit of everything at Wakulla County. A horse is welcome of course, and so is your bike, your running shoes, and your diving mask. Any way you get here, you will enjoy your time at this great ode to the attractions available in Northwest Florida.

The Wakulla County Public Library is the only library in Wakulla County. It is located in Crawfordville.

Pathways is a long-term disciplinary program and serves as an alternative to suspension and/or expulsion (Grades 6-12) for students who demonstrate problems with discipline which includes gross insubordination, disruptive, assaultive or violent behavior, substance abuse, weapons on campus, behaviors which persistently interfere with the learning of self or others, or other serious offenses in or out of school, including those which result in involvement with the Juvenile Justice system. 

The Wilderness Coast Public Library System has four branches in Franklin County, Jefferson County, and Wakulla County. They are in Eastpoint, Carrabelle, Monticello, and Crawfordville.