Florida State Parks

There are more than 170 state parks in the state of Florida. These state parks serve as the perfect destination for family-fun during summertime. Most of the state parks in Florida offer camping for tents, campers, RVs, and cabins. Looking to go for a swim? Florida state parks contain different water environments such as springs, lakes, and rivers. Or maybe you are into sight seeing and exploring nature. Nature trails usually abound in these parks making it easy to enjoy a hike, bike ride, or walk. Florida state parks provide one-of-a-kind scenic environments, diverse wildlife, and a plethora of activities for all to enjoy.

Dade Battlefield Historic State Park was Florida's first state park in 1921. The most recent state park added was Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park in 2017, becoming the Sunshines State's 175th State Park.

See Also: Florida's National Parks | Florida Parks & Recreation Departments

Florida State Parks

The Addison Blockhouse Historic State Park is home to an historic 19th century plantation that once flourished from 1816 to 1836 until it was burned in the Seminole wars. The Addison Blockhouse lies on the west side of the Tomoka River and is one of the most worthwhile sights in Volusia County.

One of Florida's best parks for dynamic biking trails is the Alafia River State Park. The park features 17 miles of bike trails that cover some of the highest elevation changes found in Florida. The park also offers at least 20 miles of trails for hikers and equestrians through pine flat wood, and with the abundance with wildlife it is also great for bird watching. The giant park is also home to a campground, playgrounds, opportunities for canoeing and fishing, and much more.

Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park is one of the most unique and exquisite state parks in north florida. The garden itself is beautiful, especially during the months of January through April when the garden is in high blooming season making it absolutely stunning. The park however, features much more than just the garden itself. There are two lakes within the park, offering all sorts of water enjoyment throughout the year including swimming, kayaking, boating, and fishing. If that wasn't enough, this park is put over the top with several miles of walking, biking, and equestrian friendly trails that overlook both lakes making the possibilities at Alfred B. Maclay Gardens State Park endless.

The Allen David Broussard Catfish Creek Preserve State Park is home to one of the rarest scrub habitats in all of Florida. The park is a whopping 8,000 square acres consisting of 6 miles of hiking trails and 7 miles of equestrian trails. The park has amazing rare plants and animals making it one of the best parks in Florida for wildlife viewing. Come prepared to track across rough and rare scrub habitats while seeing some of Florida's protected wildlife such as the scrub-jay, scrub lizard, and bald eagles!

Amelia Island State Park is located on the south side of Amelia Island and is a beautiful 200 acre beach park in the north east area of Florida. The park is an amazing untouched wilderness right on the coast of Florida that is great for all types of adventure seeking nature goers. The park is one of few parks in florida that allows horseback riding right on the beach, and even offers lessons. It's also a great fishing location with the inclusion of the mile long George Crady Bridge Fishing pier as well as the option to shore fish right along the beach. Good times are not hard to find at the Amelia Island State Park beach, whether you're looking to explore and search for shells or simply relax and enjoy the waves, Amelia Island is your destination. 

Anastasia State Park is a must see for anyone looking to explore Florida's amazing beaches in their beautiful and natural state. The park is 1,600 acres of pure possibilities. Their are 139 campsites and activities galore for all campers and visitors including stunning nature walks and trails, and a grill area with a gift shop offering rentals on boats, kayaks, canoes and more. The park is also home to the Coquina Quarry where coquina rock was once mined in order to help construct the Castillo de San Marcos. With so much to do and see, Anastasia State Park is an amazing place for campers or visitors alike looking to experience natural and historic Florida. 

Anclote Key Preserve State Park, is a chain of islands including Anclote Key, North Anclote Bar, South Anclote Bar, and Three Rooker Island. The islands are an absolute perfect location to set up a camp right on the beach and go camping over night with nothing but what you bring and the beautiful waters of the Preserve. The park is completely secluded, only accessible by boat or by ferry service; and with over 400 acres of park to explore including an amazing 1887 lighthouse, it is the perfect place to relax on the beach for as long as your supplies will let you. 

Avalon State Park is a mile long secluded and undeveloped beach just waiting for your arrival. The beach and dune habitats are home to many rare Florida species, including many species of sea turtles that use the non populated beach as a nesting place during the spring and summer months. Come prepared to enjoy a day of swimming, snorkeling, or fishing on the beach, or simply come and relax under the sun. 

Bahia Honda Key, is an island that helps to form the beautiful tropical destination that is the Florida Keys. The island is home to the park itself making Bahia Honda State Park one of the southern most state parks in the country. The park is everything you could expect from a Florida Keys tropical destination. Come visit the clear ocean waters of the island and enjoy scuba diving, snorkeling, fishing, boating, hiking and much more. 

Bald Point State Park is a 4,065 acre chunk of wildlife hanging off of the western end of the Florida panhandle right on the Golf of Mexico. The park is perfect for nature goers and birdwatchers with much of Florida's intricate habitats to explore. Not too mention the amazing wildlife on display including bald eagles in the fall, among other Florida birds migrating south for the winter. The parks beaches are also great for canoeing, kayaking, swimming, or simply relaxing near the ocean water. 

The South Fork State Park is a rare natural wonder of Florida. The park is very underdeveloped making it ideal for Wildlife viewing, birding, or exploring its hiking trails. The park is home to many rare plant life including its rosemary scrub habitat which is only found in Florida; as well as many rare plants and animals which are not commonly observed. 

Visitors can request a gate code to visit the Wingate Creek State Park and explore its rare and untouched natural habitats. Currently hiking and biking in the park is limited and it is primarily used for nature research, birding, or simply exploring nature. 

Big Lagoon State Park offers a wide variety of natural Florida habitats for an over all beautiful Florida park. The park is great for birding, hiking, camping, as well as all sorts of water activities including boating, fishing, and even crabbing. 

One of the most exciting and thrilling state parks in Florida is the Big Shoals State Park. This park is occupied by the largest whitewater rapid in all of Florida, which can reach a class 3 whitewater classification. The Park also includes beautiful views of the Suwannee River from it's magnificent 80 foot tall limestone bluffs. If that wasn't enough there are also 28 miles of hiking trails throughout the park. including the two short trails leading to the Little and Big Shoals rapids. That's right, the only way to the rapids is on foot; but don't worry, this only adds to the adventure. 

Big Talbot Island State park is a beautiful preserve that allows its visitors to take in the nature that surrounds them. The park is open from 8 in the morning until sundown every single day of the year. The boat ramp is available 24 hours a day, so guests can come here to take their boats out on the water. The remarkable thing about this state park is the Boneyard Beach. The trunks and twisted limbs of fallen trees are a beautiful sight and is quite the spot for photography practice. Guests can also fish, ride their bicycle, bird-watch, go hiking, picnicking, and pick up sea shells along the beaches waves. 

Open every day of the year, Blackwater Heritage State Park is a great place to go for mountain biking or just plain old bicycling, hiking, and horseback riding. The paved trails, which add up to more than nine miles in total, are great for walkers too, and some paths are shaded for more enjoyment. People also find some great photography shots of nature while they are here, with the wildlife that lives so peacefully here. There are multiple wooden bridges throughout the state park that exercisers can walk/ride over with creeks running underneath them. Pets are allowed as long as they are on a leash, so feel free to bring your little four legged friend with you. Restroom facilities, picnic pavilions, playgrounds, and water fountains are also found around the state park. 

Blackwater River State Park is made for the outdoor enthusiasts. Activities like canoeing, kayaking, camping, and picnicking are some of the more popular activities, along with walking through the park's nature trails surrounded by trees. Blackwater State Forest and Blackwater River State Park are a part of the largest longleaf pine ecosystem that's left in the world. They say it's even rarer than a tropic rainforest, so be sure to bring your camera when you visit to get some excellent photography shots of nature at its finest. Guests can also came here in tents or RV's if they want to make their stay a little longer.

Situated along St. John's River, there's quite a few treasures at Blue Spring State Park. Swimming, diving, snorkeling, and tubing are just a few of the water activities that can be done at Blue Spring State Park. What makes this state park so unique, though, is the ability to see some manatees in their natural habitat. Before the park was established in 1970, researchers found there was only a small number of the sea cows, less than 20. But after 2018 and careful protection efforts, there are now around 485 gentle sea creatures that call Blue Spring their home. Guests can also canoe or kayak, renting these at the park if they wish, or they can take a guided river boat cruise if walking 4.5 miles on Pine Island Trail seems a bit daunting. Bring a picnic and enjoy the day at Blue Spring State Park. 

Bulow Creek State Park is home to one of the largest live oak trees in the South. For over 400 years, it has stood silent to humankind's activities. There are trails where visitors can walk or run. Most often, wildlife will be near the edge of the wooded areas. Animals that are most commonly seen are white tailed deer, barred owls, and raccoons, among others. The Bulow Woods Trail is nearly seven miles long and leads the way to Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic Site Park. Pavilions stand on the grounds for guests to have picnics and restroom facilities are available for those who need them.

Bulow Plantation Ruins Historic State Park is home to 150 acres of Bulow Plantations where the Bulow family grew sugar cane, cotton, rice, and indigo. The ruins consist of an old sugar mill and what remains of the home's foundations as well as some of the slave cabins. Today, there is a trail that leads visitors to the ruins. As well as some history, there is also picnic facilities for those that would like to spend a few hours here and a boat ramp for canoes and small powerboats to float on the Bulow Creek. Fishing is permitted from a boat or on the docks. 

Caladesi Island State park is one of the few untouched islands along the Gulf Coast and it's only accessible by boat. Visitors can kayak through the bayside mangrove forest and walk along the beautiful shores of the beach. There's also a nature trail along the island where guests can see a multitude of animals in their natural habitats. Also on the island is the historic ruins of the Scharrer Homestead, once home to a family who lived in peace on the island. Myrtle Scharrer Betz, who lived in the home, called this place "paradise" in her memoirs. 

Home to one of the largest coastal dune lakes in Florida, Camp Helen State Park is located in Panama City Beach. This park is 180 acres in size and activities that can be done here include swimming, beachcombing, nature study, hiking, and both freshwater and saltwater fishing. Guests can also learn how to kayak and paddle board if they are feeling adventurous enough. The walking trails for hikers have some great photographic characteristics so be sure to bring your camera if you're into nature photography shots. 

Cedar Key Museum State Park is home to what used to be called the St. Clair Whitman Museum. St. Clair Whitman lived in Cedar Key since he was a boy in the late 1800s and during his lifetime, he was involved in both of Cedar Key's major industries, the cedar pencil mill and the fiber factory. He also had quite a collection of seashells and Native American Artifacts. When Whitman died  in 1959, he dedicated all of his collections to the University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History. The museum with these belongings and Whitman's home was donated by his family in 1991. The home was restored to look like the inside of a 1920s style home and the museum itself also has some cool artifacts from the same time. Birdwatching is also a big pastime here, so be sure to bring your binoculars to check out the birds. A canoe launch and nature trails line the property and pets are allowed as long as they are on a leash. 

What is essentially a series of islands in the South Eastern region of Tampa Bay, Cockroach Bay Preserve State Park does not actually have cockroaches on the property. What early Spanish explorers called "cockroaches" were nothing more than horseshoe crabs, and at one point, there was an abundance of these little sea critters. While the islands are 617 acres, about 500 of those acres are mangrove swamp, which makes it the perfect place for fisherman and/or birdwatchers. Keep in mind the islands are only accessible by watercraft so there are no actual facilities on them. In two small creeks along the shores, canoeing and kayaking is allowed. 

Colt Creek State Park is full of natural wonders. With more than 5,000 acres of native Central Florida habitat, this is the perfect place to see nature as nature intended. There are many different activities that can be done here. With more than 15 miles of multi use trails, visitors can walk or run, ride a bike, or ride a horse if they want to. Canoeing and kayaking are two of the water related activities that can be done here. Cold Creek State Park is home to many white tailed deer, American alligators, otters, birds, and butterflies, as well as the threatened gopher tortoise and the Sherman's fox squirrel. 

Visitors to this area can take a self-guided tour through the museum that houses displays from the mid 1800s when Florida hosted its first State Constitution Convention. The constitution became the Organic Law of Florida after four more constitution conventions and Florida was finally admitted to the Union as the 27th state. There are actual artifacts from this time period and an audio-animated mannequin demonstration of the debates and the process of drafting a state constitution. It's definitely a history lesson if you happen to stop by!

This National Historic Landmark is 61 acres of pre-Columbian, Native American lands with burial mounds, temple platform mounds, a plaza area, and a midden. For over 1,600 years, the site served as a ceremonial center for Native Americans and people traveled to the complex from great distances to bury their dead. It's estimated that 7,500 Native Americans may have visited the area every year. Aside from the history, this park is also great for bird watchers and fisherman. 

Some of the activities that can be done at Crystal River Preserve State Park include bicycling, fishing, hiking, walking, and running. There are also boat tours available to take visitors through the rarity that is the spring-fed body of water that is the Crystal River to see how it supports the sea and wildlife with it being both fresh and salt water. Boat tours are about one and half hours long for those who are interested. There is a seven-mile loop trail that is away from the simpler trails of the state park that's perfect for those who love to go off the beaten path. 

This park is one of the most historic parks in the state of Florida. On these grounds, the Dade's Battle of 1835 took place. It was the longest and most costly Indian war in American history, thus making this a National Historic Landmark. Every January, there are thousands of visitors who come to the grounds to see the battle reenactment as well as peruse the beautiful grounds. The small museum that sits on the grounds houses actual artifacts and exhibits related to the Florida Seminole wars. During the summer, there are day camps that take place for kids with tons of activities to keep them entertained. Open every day of the week, visitors come here to hike and bike, picnic, go birding, and geo-seeking. It's also a great place for hosting gatherings including weddings. Definitely check it out if you're interested in history!

Open to the public every day of the year, there's a lot of nature to enjoy here. De Leon Springs is a naturally round swimming area where guests are more than welcome to swim, snorkel, and scuba dive in the pretty clear waters. The springs used to power a sugar cane mill and later a grist mill that turned corn into flour during the Civil War. Now you'll find trails for hikers, walkers, and runners. Visitors can enjoy viewing the wildlife and subtropical forest that is home to a large, old cypress tree. There is a boat tour that visitors can check out that take you through the De Leon Springs State Park and Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge and a playground for the younger kids as well as picnic pavilions and a restaurant. 

Not only is this a beach where people can swim, it also has a rare dune lake within the property. In this coastal dune, visitors can expect to find magnolias, golden asters, woody goldenrod, and scrub oaks as well as more rare plants like the spoonflower, pitcher plants, and Curtiss' sand grass within the park. There are also plenty of other wildflowers to add color to this attractive state park as well as some nature trails for the nature lovers. Visitors like to walk across the dunes to the beach and picnic with their friends and families during the nicer weather. Fishing is also allowed here so be sure to bring your fishing rods if you're a fan of fishing. 

Open from Wednesdays to Sundays, this state park is a beautiful area to visit. On the grounds is a natural sinkhole within the mini rain forest. Visitors can learn all about the sinkhole and what research it has provided in a variety of ways through interpretive displays around the park. Apart from the natural sinkhole to check out, there is also a nature trail that is home to many small critters and plant life. With the peaceful setting and smells of nature around you, it's hard not to relax here. 

Don Pedro Island State Park is only accessible by private boat or ferry, but it's definitely worth the short trip across the water. There are endangered species in this area, such as West Indian manatees, gopher tortoises, bald eagles, and American oystercatchers, so be sure to be on the lookout for the wildlife. The beach is one mile long with beautiful white sand where visitors can sunbathe, swim, snorkel, and look for sea shells. The entire park is 230 acres of land and is a popular area for hikers and nature lovers to explore. With a fishing dock, kayak launch, paddle boarding rentals, and picnic facilities, it's easy to spend a few hours here!

This park is a beautiful area for those who just need to relax and get away for a few hours or even a day. There's a sandy white beach for visitors to sunbath, play in the sand, swim, and look for sea shells as well as fishing spots, hiking trails, and the option to camp and enjoy nature for more than a day. It's very possible to see a variety of animals here such as dolphins, sea turtles, and other saltwater fish along with a variety of birds. If you're a fan of nature photography, this is the perfect place to get some practice in with the camera. The state park is also one of the best areas to stargaze at, so even if you don't decide to camp, be sure to stick around until after dark to look at the beautiful night skies. 

With 6,200 acres of land and water, this state park is full of natural beauty. Sandhills covered in longleaf pines, wiregrass, and sand pine scrub are homes to several endangered animals like the gopher tortoise and the fox squirrel. There are plenty of marked trails for hikers, bikers, and walkers, as well as a fishing dock, a canoe launch, and picnic areas that make the park a great place to spend the day. 

The Econfina River State Park is home to extensive wildlife and breathtaking landscapes. There are equestrian trails, nature trails, a boat ramp, and a canoe-kayak launch on site. This beautiful state park is over 4,500 acres and offers several once-in-a-lifetime experiences.

Eden Garden State Park is one of the beautiful state parks Florida has to offer with a long fascinating history dating back to 1890.  One of the interesting things about this park is the two-story house which guest can tour. This house, although renovated has been around since 1897; a must go to for history lovers or just for families looking for activities to do on a free afternoon!

Located in Crawfordville, Florida, the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park is the perfect destination for anyone craving a weekend getaway. With a variety of activities that range from swimming, hiking, snorkeling, horseback riding, and kayaking, one is sure to find an activity that the entire family can enjoy. There is a camping ground where one can set up a tent to enjoy the wildlife scenery during the day and stargaze by night. If outside camping isn’t your thing, then worry not. A lodge is offered at the property so that one can enjoy nature while still feeling at home.

Egmont Key is a Florida State Park located in the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of Tampa Bay. The park is primarily a wildlife refuge, and is accessible only by boat or ferry. Nature enthusiasts will appreciate the views and abundance of wildlife that the park has to offer. There are multiple trails and unique historical sites here, including the ruins of Fort Dade: a 19th century era fort. Also present is a manned lighthouse that has stood since 1858. The remote nature of Egmont Key makes for a perfect getaway on its secluded beaches. However, this also means that there are no stores or drinking water to be found here. Come prepared, and enjoy a slice of the natural beauty that Florida has to offer!

Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park has many things to offer including walking information tours to get up close and personal with the surrounding wildlife in an underwater observatory. The park also provides a variety of animals including: manatees, alligators, black bears, red wolf, key deer, flamingos, whooping cranes, and a hippopotamus named Lu. At the park you can enjoy boat tours, swimming, hiking, picnics, bird watching, and more. These beautiful crystal waters provide a clear insight into what lies beneath the water while making it interesting for all ages. 

Residing in South Florida, Estero Bay Preserve State Park offers plenty of activities for those seeking something new and natural. Venture into the preserve either through the entrance at Winkler Point, Fort Meyers, or Estero River Scrub entrance. Hiking, cycling, and boating are some of the many things you can do to trek and explore this preserve with over 10,000 acres of natural land. 

Eureka West Recreation Area is a great outdoor, family-friendly place that offers exciting experiences like boating and fishing. The state park is wheelchair accessible. It also has a picnic pavilion and a boat ramp that is open 24 hours a day. The park itself is open from sunrise to sunset. Located in Marion County the park is about 4 miles north of State County Road 316 on the east side of Fort McCoy. 

A former site of a massive logging operation is now the largest state park in Florida, Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park and it is located in Copeland Florida. Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park curates an abundant amount of animal and plant species that can not be found anywhere else in the United States. The beauty of the Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park are the divisions within the park. It is divided into four areas, Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, East River, Jones Grade Lakes, and Jane's Memorial Scenic Drive. Along with the four main sections of the park it has a hiking trail and a biking trail as well. Once you take a walk within the Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, you get led into the heart of the largest royal palm and bald cypress swamp in the world, making Fakahatchee State Park a park like no other. 

The Florida Caverns are the only above ground cavern in all of Florida accessible to tourists - and for the only cave in Florida, they are absolutely amazing. The park itself is massive and contains caves, beautifully diverse trails, and even a small yet deep spring that is available to swim in. 

Fanning Springs State Park is located along the Suwannee River and has crystal clear waters with a temperature of 72 degrees year-round; perfect for swimming, snorkeling, and scuba diving. Along the beautiful blue waters, the park offers options for grilling and picnicking around the live oaks and a boardwalk leading you to a cypress swamp. The boardwalk also gives an amazing overlook of the Suwannee River and its amazing wildlife in their natural habitat. In the winter months it is common to see manatees swimming up towards the warmer waters and during summer months you can see musk turtles, bass mullet, freshwater flounder, and bowfin. Fanning Springs State Park is perfect for a day with family and friends to enjoy water activities and natural Florida sight-seeing throughout the entire park.

Faver-Dykes State Park offers a variety activities for nature enthusiasts. Longleaf pines and turkey oaks provide both shade and beauty for hikers venturing along Hiram-Faver and Pine Loop Trails. Colorful flicks from nature's paint brush in the form of wildflowers and blueberries grace these lands that once gave life to the Timucuan Indians. For the aquatically inclined, embark upon a journey down the Pellicer Creek. Head west to its freshwater beginnings or east to its salty embrace with the intracoastal. Bald eagles, manatees, river otters, and great blue herons call this many fingered waterway their home. Bask in these tranquil environs for an afternoon picnic or submerse yourself via a multi-night camping stay, either way this flora and fauna haven is a must see for all those visiting the northeast shores of Florida. 

Open 365 days a year, Felburn Park sits on 140-acres of property owned by the Felburn Foundation. Located on the south side of the Cross Florida Barge Canal, Felburn Park has several picnic pavilions, paved running trails, and a small playgrounds for the kiddos. If you find yourself heading west from the park along Withlacoochee Bay you will be running into multiple use platforms. These platforms are great for picnicking, taking a break from your run, or a day of fishing. Adding to Felburn Park is Phil's Lake. At this lake you will be able to find a number of freshwater fish. In addition, canoes, kayaks, and non-motorized crafts are allowed in the lake. 

Fernandina Plaza Historic State Park is filled with a rich history, a beautiful view. Once the site of the wooden Spanish Fort San Carlos, the park now hosts beautiful old Victorian houses, with the Plaza sill remaining. Sitting atop a bluff you will find an tranquil view of the Amelia river. It is the smallest state park in Florida, home to about 0.8 acres that offer a wonderful location for your next picnic. Sit on the bluffs watching the shrimp boats head out to sea, enjoy the breeze and salty air, and take in the history.

Did you know that caverns are pretty rare in the state of Florida? If you're in the area, this is the place to check out! Walking tours are available every day of the year except Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Caverns are a great way to spend a hot day because when you go under ground, it gets cooler. You'll see stalactites, stalagmites, flowstones, and draperies while exploring the Florida Caverns. The cave passageways were actually enlarged by hand in the 1930s by workers so it was easier for visitors to stand rather than hunch down while they walked through. 

The Florida Keys Overseas Heritage Trail is a 106 mile trail that runs throughout the Florida Keys from Key Largo to Key West. The trail is suited for pedestrians and bicyclists alike and parallels U.S. Highway 1. Carrying such designations as a National Scenic Highway and All-American Road. Park-goers and trail-goers can experience a wide range of activities such as skating, sightseeing, paddling, mountain biking, and boating to name a few.

The Forest Capital Museum State Park is dedicated to celebrating and showing Florida's beautiful pine trees. Weddings are often held at the Forest Capital Museum State Park due to the beautiful scenery. Well behaved dogs on leashes are permitted on site, except for indoors. The Forest Capital museum is onsite as well and its goal is to provide information on Florida's pine trees.

Fort Clinch State Park is one of the parks in Florida that holds much historical significance. As shown by the rows of cannons that are lined up across the St. Mary's River, it served as a strategic ground during the Civil War. The park offers tours with fun filled activities where one can learn about the historic events that took place at the site. During the first weekend of each month, one can relive the events that occurred in the battle field with the firing of the cannons and other battlefield demonstrations. 

Fort Cooper State Park offers a wide variety of natural sights and wonders. To start, Lake Holathlikaha is a pristine lake that is best viewed by boat or while kayaking across its majesty. Fort Cooper also boasts 700 acres of fertile lands covered in hiking trails to take in the beauty of Florida. 

Fort Foster State Historic site was originally a fort occupied by Col. William S. Foster and some 430 men. Today, the park can be enjoyed with a re-enactment of the conflict between the Seminole Nation and the U.S. military during the Second Seminole War. Park staff and re-enactors will be sure to provide families with a welcome trip into the history that sits in the backyard of Hillsborough River State Park with two living history events, featured annually in January and December: Fort Foster Rendezvous and the Candlelight Experience at Fort Foster.

Fort George Island is a state park like no other. It is quite the tourist attraction with several activities to partake, like boating, hiking, bird watching, geo-seeking, and many more. It is home to the stunning Kingsley Plantation and Ribault Club house that cater to many special events, secluded among one hundred acres of land with a breathtaking waterfront view. For an unforgettable experience, you can take a guided tour around the park and learn its historical roots while taking in the serene abundance of plant and animal life.

Fort Mose is an historic state park that offers visitors 40 acres of space for picnicking, birding, and historic sightseeing. The park opened in October 1994. It has garnished attention from the expansive knowledge on wildlife and also has one of the most interactive museums in any state park. It is the site of the first legally sanctioned free African settlement in the United States for those fleeing slavery in the Carolinas

Fort Pierce Inlet State Park is a beautiful park with a half-mile beach where citizens can surf, snorkel, swim, or scuba-dive. Fishing, picnicking, sight-seeing, and bicycling are other common activities. 

The Fort Zachary Taylor Historic Park is a great site for history buffs, beach lovers, and more. The Fort Zachary Taylor Historic Park touts Key West's favorite beach and is home to the largest collection of Civil War military memorabilia. Civil War reenactments are held every third weekend of the month at The Fort Zachary Taylor Historic Park. If you cannot make it on the third weekend either the tour guides or the interpretive panels tell how important The Fort Zachary Taylor Historic Park's role was in the Civil War and Spanish-American War. In addition to the the Civil War historical offerings, the park provides concession and restaurant, paddling, snorkeling, swimming, and fishing. Whether you want to learn about the Civil War on lounge around on the beach, The Fort Zachary Taylor Historic Park has something just for you.

Fred Gannon Rocky Bayou State Park, formerly a WWII gunnery and bombing practice range, is now a stunning park full of longleaf pines. This park offers many different experiences including camping, beautiful fishing spots, geo-seeking, hiking, and biking paths. It's a perfect spot for a picnic underneath their picnic pavilion. This park is popular day spot with a playground, kayak and canoe launch, and it's pet friendly! It also offers RV camping with restroom facilities and a shower station. Come enjoy a relaxing day at the park and an out of this world Panhandle sunset.

Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail is a 16 mile trail that goes from Gainesville's Boulware Springs Park through the Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park. This trail makes for a great day trip and is designed for walking, cycling, and horseback riding. Throughout the trail you're bound to see beautiful overlooks as well as plenty of wildlife and plant communities. They have parking available at four trailheads for your convenience. Fishing is permitted in specific parts of the trail bridges at Prairie Creek and Lochloosa Creek. Gainesville-Hawthorne State Trail is perfect for discovering old Florida history.

Gamble Rogers Memorial State Recreation Area at Flagler Beach is a beautiful island on the shore of the Atlantic. Take a walk on the beach and go shelling in the morning sunrise and star gazing at night. Explore the the islands’ nature; hiking, biking, boating, canoeing, kayaking, or fishing on the gentle Intracoastal Waterway. Make it your own and enjoy a sunny day at the beach.

Gasparilla Island State Park offers guests many activities, including snorkeling, swimming, shelling, and nature-watching. The star of the park is the restored Port Boca Grande Lighthouse built in 1890. 

General James A. Van Fleet State Trail named after General James A. Van Fleet, a prominent Polk county resident, who was a U.S. military commanding officer. He is most recognized for his service during the Normandy Invasion, the Battle of the Bulge, and the Korean War. The General James A. Van Fleet Trail runs 29.2 miles long and passes through Florida's most widely sought out paddling havens like the Peace, Hillsborough, and Withlacoochee rivers. The horse trail parallel to the General James A. Van Fleet Trail and provides a place for equestrians to ride their horses. The General James A. Van Fleet Trail is pet-friendly, it has wheelchair accessibility, restroom facilities, and a picnic pavilion.

This state park contains of one mile long pedestrian only fishing bridge where visitors can catch a variety of fish with a hook. It's one of the best fishing areas on the Northeast side of Florida, so it's a must to check out if you're looking for a great place to relax with a fishing pole. To get to the bridge, visitors have to travel through Amelia Island State Park but it's a beautiful drive full of natural scenery and you might even get a few glimpses of the wildlife that live there. 

Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park is a collection of natural springs that produce about 44 million gallons of water per day. The spring is called the Gilchrist Blue because of its clear, gorgeous blue waters. The main spring is known for its wildlife including turtles, fish, and invertebrates. Water activities such as paddle boarding, swimming, and snorkeling are all common at the spring head and spring run. Other activities at the park include hiking, nature trails, and picnicking. Pavilions are available that offer a food concession stand and beverage service. Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park is ideal for a day surrounded by nature and beautiful waters with the whole family. 

Grayton Beach State Park is a 2200 acre park featuring beautiful natural beaches with rolling dunes covered in sea oats and snowy white sand along emerald waters. Located between Panama City Beach and Destin in the Northwest Region of Florida right next to the town of Seaside. Grayton Beach State Park is Florida at it's most natural state with nature trails, nature trails, boating, fishing (both saltwater and freshwater), and swimming. 

If you're looking for an unforgettable natural escape, look no further! Witness the breathtaking hammocks, flatwoods, marshes, swamps, and much more as you paddle board along the blackwater creek of Haw Creek Preserve all the way to Crescent Lake. Try to spot the native wildlife on your tour, and see why anglers call the swamps a prime fishing location. You can also help employees fulfill the Florida State Parks' mission and learn about the park's fascinating history and origin during your stay, but don't forget to keep an eye out for the moss hung cypress trees. They're quite the tourist attraction.

Henderson Beach State Park  has something in store for everyone! From a nature trail to sandy white beaches, Henderson Beach State Park is a must for those who love the beach and nature in general. 

Highland Hammock State Park is a Florida State Park located west of Sebring in Highlands County, off of U.S. 27. It is one of the four original Florida State Parks, and is home to the state's only Civilian Conservation Corps Museum. The park is over 9000 acres of ancient oak hammocks and floodplain forests, and possesses some of Florida’s most unique and diverse collection of plant and animal life. Black bears, tortoises, Florida panthers, deer, alligators, and a variety of birds can be found roaming this massive park. Wildlife viewers will appreciate that Highland Hammock is also a part of the Great Florida Birding Trail. There are multiple campsites and nine nature trails, with ranger-guided tours consistently available throughout the year. Stock up on bug repellent, and come experience the real natural Florida at its best.

This is a beautiful state park near the downtown Tampa area. There are over seven miles of natural trails to enjoy and it's also a great place to go for a swim on a hot day. Hillsborough River State Park is also home to Fort Foster State Historic Site, where they do occasional living-history demonstrations of life at Fort Foster. There are two occasions throughout the year: Fort Foster Rendezvous in January and the Candlelight Experience at Fort Foster in December. Both events are historical and neat to view, so be sure to check it out if you're close enough. They also tell you all about the fort and the part it played in the Second Seminole War. 

Whether you're hiking, picnicking, or just looking for a place to take in some fresh air on a mid-morning run, the Historic Santos Recreation Area has an activity waiting for you. Located near a former historic Negro League baseball field, the site offers plenty of recreational opportunities, as well as an annual celebration of Historic Santos on the last Saturday in February. 

If you're looking for a peaceful escape, Honeymoon Island State Park is the place to find it. As its name suggests, it's a natural getaway with an abundance of activities and amenities to explore. Discover miles of beach and pine forests on a trail as you identify the native wildlife to the area, like horned owls and gopher tortoises. You can partake in activities like paddling, surfing, picnicking at one of their pavilions, or even hold a wedding ceremony near the playground, but the getaway's comforting nature and unforgettable sights truly make the ideal park experience.

Spanning over 1600 acres, the Hontoon Island State Park is home to all different types of Florida wildlife ranging from warblers to limpkins to kingfishers. In addition to the vast variety of wildlife the Hontoon Island State Park is a place that offers primitive camping, boating, bicycling, paddling, and more. 

Make sure to stop by Hugh Taylor Birch State Park if you find yourself in Fort Lauderdale. It has been considered the city's own Central Park since Hugh Taylor Birch preserved it for future generations to come. Hugh Taylor Birch State Park is the perfect destination for residents to enjoy leisure activities such as rollerblading, jogging, or reading under a palm tree. They even have access to the beach through the pedestrian's tunnel under A1A. The state park also contains boat access points from the intracoastal waterway so that one can navigate through the waters as they observe the various wildlife that it has to offer. 

Ichetucknee Springs is a 2,669-acre State Park located in North Florida. Its main attraction are the 8 major crystalline springs. They join together to create the six-mile long Ichetucknee River, perfect for tubing, kayaking, and snorkeling! The park offers Paddling Adventures rentals, where guest can rent equipment and get access to the park's transportation services such as shuttle buses, ensuring they make the most out of their time at the park. The General Store offers both hot and cold dining options, including hamburgers, fries, sandwiches, and ice cream that guests can enjoy at the outdoor picnic tables located throughout the park. In addition to these attractions, the park is a safe haven to many wildlife species such as beaver, otter, gar, softshell turtle, wild turkey, wood duck, and limpkin. Guests may catch a glimpse of many of these critters as they explore any of the park's three nature trails, guiding visitors through lush forests, sandhill plains, and the towering longleaf pine environments preserved here. Whether you're a nature enthusiast or just looking for a way to cool off in the Florida heat, Ichetucknee Springs offers fun for guests of all interests and ages!

Indian Key Historic State Park is a small island only accessible via boat. It can be an ideal location for those looking to swim, sunbathe, and hike along with other activities. Open year round starting at 8am to sundown, this historic park sits on 11 acres and only 1/2 mile off shore. Back in the 1800's it was business salvaging cargo for the Florida Keys. It is a great visit for a day of animal watching and kayaking in which you can easily see a stingray and maybe even a shark. 

The Indian River Lagoon Preserve is home to one of the most protected wetlands and salt marshes in Florida, giving visitors a chance to see breathtaking landscapes brimming with diverse wildlife and native exotic plants. This hidden gem has been designated an Outstanding Florida Water and is revered as one of North America’s Estuaries of National Significance.

The Inglis Bypass Recreation Area is a popular fishing spot for fresh and saltwater species with two picnic pavilions located nearby to enjoy the day in the shade. Additionally, mowed grass paths run Eastward along the Bypass Canal, creating an idea environment for hiking, biking, and other recreational activities.

The Inglis Dam & Recreation Area is home to a historic dam that was built in the early 1900s. It offers several unique experiences. Visitors are able to go horseback riding, fishing, mountain biking, wildlife viewing, boating, and more.

The Inglis Lock Recreation Area has recreational things to do like taking a leisurely walk, running, and biking along the trail. Located about an hour south of Gainesville, the Inglis Lock Recreation Area is in close proximity to the western end of the Cross Florida Greenway and has been inoperable since 1999. The Inglis Lock Recreation Area sits on over 70,000 acres of land with over 1200 of that land being used for multi-purpose trails. In addition to the trails the Inglis Lock Recreation Area has freshwater bank fishing, saltwater fishing, wildlife viewing opportunities and more. Don't forget to get your Inglis Lock Recreation Area stamp when you visit. 

John D. MacArthur State Park is a Florida State Park located on Singer Island in North Palm Beach. In the 1970s, businessman John D. MacArthur donated 348 acres for the construction of the park, which was first opened to the public in 1989. MacArthur Park is a natural barrier island that provides refuge for several endangered plant and animal species, mainly because it features a rare mixture of coastal areas, along with two distinct types of tropical forests: hardwood hammock and mangrove. Many species of birds and rare turtles can be found here. This also makes MacArthur State Park popular for all types of water sport enthusiasts.

This state park was named after John Gorrie, a physician who was deeply involved with his community as he served as a postmaster, city treasurer, town councilman, and even a bank director. During his lifetime, yellow fever was a big problem in the area, and he found that the cooler the room, the easier it was for patients to survive. He received the first U.S. Patent for mechanical refrigeration in 1851 and this ice-making machine sits in the museum on the this state park property. There are, of course, other artifacts throughout the lifetime of Gorrie that sit on display in the museum, as well as some history of the Florida Park Service, which is dedicated to preserving the natural areas of Florida. Along with the museum, people can picnic on the grounds when it's a beautiful day outside.

Underwater and spanning 70 nautical miles, John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park is unlike any other park in Florida. Like many parks it offers picnicking, fishing, canoeing, swimming at the beach, and tropical hammocks. What sets it apart is the coral reef resting just below its waters. For those looking to get a view of life under the waves there are tours with glass bottomed boats and kayaking tours available. But adventure-seekers wanting to see up close what this sunken site has to offer have access to snorkeling and scuba-diving. Anyone who is interested in the park but not getting wet can view the many nature videos and salt-water aquariums on the park's campus.

The Judah P. Benjamin Confederate Memorial at Gamble Plantation Historic State Park is the only surviving plantation house in South Florida. Once a 16-acre sugar plantation, the preserved mid-19th-century Antebellum mansion is now a portal to the past, allowing visitors to experience a bygone era in Florida's history.

If you're a passionate angler or you just like being out on the water, the Kenwood Recreation area is a prime fishing location. Nearly every weekend, the park holds a range of fishing tournaments from ten to over one hundred and fifty participating boats! If fishing simply isn't your thing, there's plenty of other things to love about the park, like the boating expeditions, picnic pavilions, and wildlife. It's located on the Rodman Reservoir, where you can also enjoy hiking along trails, camping, and much more.

The Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park is a part of the Everglades headwaters located near Central Florida.  It makes up one of the largest remaining tracts of Florida dry prairie, a unique Florida ecosystem home to many endangered and endemic species. For those hoping to catch a glimpse of the many species that call the prairie home, the wide and open landscape provides bird-watchers, photographers, and other wildlife enthusiasts the opportunity to spot them. Another prominent and unique feature of the park is its lack of light pollution, allowing campers and stargazers to see the bands of the Milky Way without any binoculars or special cameras. Other experiences and amenities offered by the park include bicycling, camping, horseback riding  trails, hiking, picnicking, and wildlife tours.

Lying in Southwest Florida, Koreshan Park takes you back to a simpler life chosen by the Koreshans, a pioneer group in the late 1800's. The park offers traditional outdoor activities such as fishing, camping, boating, and hiking. You can spend your time touring the Koreshan settlement, tracking through the peaceful bamboo trails, or geo-seeking for unique finds. If you get hungry on your journey, the park offers cooked-from-scratch samples of the food Korehsans ate during their time on the banks of the Estero River. 

Lafayette Blue Springs State Park flows into the beautiful Suwannee River. The spring has crystal blue waters that you can swim, canoe, or paddle board in. The park also has many other amenities such as a campground, rental vacation cabins, equestrian trails, and a picnic pavillion. A natural limestone bridge crosses the spring run for visitors to walk across and see all the wildlife the park has to offer. Whether you are looking to go camping for the weekend or take the family out on the boat, Lafayette Blue Springs State Park is a gorgeous spot to be outdoors.

Lake Griffin State Park is home to Florida's second oldest Live Oak Tree, which is approximately 400 years old. It is a great place to sightsee and enjoy nature. The park offers 40 campsites, each with water and electricity, and some even include a sewer. Activities offered at Lake Griffin State Park include kayak and canoe tours, boat tours, and hiking. Various wildlife such as raccoons, bobcats, coyotes, and bears are all commonly found in the park's trails. 

Hiking, wildlife viewing, and picnicking may be the most traditional activities observed at Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park, but families might be interested in taking a guided tour of the park's earthen temple mounds as well. A journey into Florida's Territorial Period and early statehood is just a short drive north of Florida State University, on the wildlife-rich southern border of Lake Jackson.

Lake June-in-Winter Scrub State Park is a preserve that offers protection to the sand scrub, which is one of Florida's most endangered areas. It is predominately scrub habitat and contains the highest concentration of rare plant and animal life, so the view and experience are exceptional here. Spot rare animals native to the area, like the Florida scrub-jay, Florida scrub lizard, Florida mouse, Eastern indigo snake, and more! Walk the nature trail, hike the white sugar sand firelanes, fish from the shore, or take a canoe across the lake. Learn why this park has its own unique and fascinating history.

Lake Kissimmee State Park has something for history buffs and nature lovers alike! Home to a variety of beautiful and unique wildlife, visitors at this former Florida cow camp can expect to see white-tailed deer, bald eagles, sandhill cranes, turkeys, and even bobcats. Located on the shores of lakes Kissimmee, Tiger, and Rosalie, there are countless recreational outdoor activities that groups and individuals can embark on. Enjoy boating, canoeing, and fishing in the picturesque lakes, or take in the views while you hike over 13 miles of scenic trails to observe and study the abundant plant and animal life. There are also six miles of trail opened to horseback riding and amenities such as shaded picnic areas, full-facility camping areas, and outdoor pavilions. The park's seclusion and distance from light pollution allows campers to take in dark skies and stargaze. For those looking to learn about some of Florida's history, your more into experiencing history, the park now offers a 1876 first person interpretive Cow Camp where attendees can see what it was like to live as a Florida Cow Hunter in the late 19th century.  

Only 30 minutes away from Orlando, Lake Louisa State Park is a perfect spot for Orlando locals to come to and relax. This state park is full of wildlife and activities; Lake Louisa State Park provides opportunities for biking, boating, camping, kayaking, and many more activities that nature lovers could enjoy.

Lake Manatee State Park is located 15 miles east of Bradenton, bordering the south shore of the lake that lends it its name. Although you won't be able to view manatees from this location, the park features a beautiful swimming beach, camping and picnicking areas, freshwater fishing from your boat or the park's fishing docks, and a variety of hiking trails through pine flatwoods, sand pine scrub, and hardwood forest. 

Lake Talquin State Park is a true one-of-a-kind state park. Unlike most areas in Florida, Lake Talquin State Park is nestled in between bluffs that overlook the lake. Lake Talquin itself is close to 10,000 acres in size and guests are welcome to fish, picnic, hike, and go bird watching.

The Landbridge Trailhead is the first of its kind, providing access to the I-75 Landbridge over stunning natural trails. The trailhead was designed to minimize ecological damage to the surrounding area and is framed with native plants. The trail boasts a unique parking experience with natural bike trails, hiking trails, horseback rides, and shaded picnic areas to explore.

Encompassing Florida's tallest Native American ceremonial mound that was built around 1,800 years ago, Letchworth-Love Mounds Archaeological State Park offers a wide array of activities for the entire family to enjoy. Some of the activities include bird watching, hiking a half-mile nature trail, picnicking, and touring the numerous wildlife roaming around. While it's nice to explore the nature in the heart of Florida's capital, the state park also serves to educate on the Swift Creek Culture, whom were the people that built the mound between 200 and 450 A.D. 

Named by the afluent Miami chemist William J. Matheson, Lignumvitae Key Botanical State Park is an island of hardwood hammock forests spared from the increasing industrialization of nearby areas. The island is only accessible via boat tours or private boat rentals.

Little Manatee River State Park is known for having some of the cleanest water in Florida. Visitors can camp on site, horseback ride, fish, picnic, hike, and more. An amphitheater, shower station, playground, and laundry station are some of the amenities available at the park.

There is quite a lot to do and explore at Little Talbot Island. With miles of untouched beaches, white sand, and trails, the experience is breathtakingly beautiful. Partake in paddling or surfing the current, go on a hike or guided tour along the three mile trails and identify different exhibits, camp on the grounds and sit around a campfire circle, or have a picnic at one of the pavilions. There's even a biking trail and spots for fishing too. They have a lot of accommodations for their explorers, and there's plenty to see. This state park is one worth the visit!

Lovers Key State Park has been donated to the people of Florida for its beautiful beaches and mangrove forests and is located in Fort Myers Beach, Florida. The canals and lagoons are home to manatees, dolphins, and shorebirds. Lovers Key State Park, just like its name, is a romantic destination and perfect for beachside weddings. This gorgeous state park is perfect for a kayak ride along serene waters or enjoying the views from the sandy shore. 

The Lower Wekiva River Preserve State Park is a great place for a family outing or day off. Some of the activities for visitors include hiking, bicycling, paddling, and fishing. The park also includes a nature trail, equestrian trail, shower station, and canoe-kayak launch.

Madira Bickel Mound State Archaeological Site is a ceremonial mound composed of sand and shells. Archaeologists have found at least three periods of Native American Cultures on this lush coastal landscape. This ancient site was the first in Florida to be considered an archaeological site, and has been dated back as far as 2000 years. This site is located in Terra Ceia, Florida and has picnic tables available for use currently and interpretive exhibits available. 

Madison Blue Spring State Park is a must see for people who love swimming and cave diving. This state park is located in Lee, Florida about an hour from Jacksonville. Madison Blue Spring State Park is popular for its scenic woodlands and its 82 feet wide, 25 feet deep, spring. Some of the many things you can experience include birding, paddling, fishing, scuba diving, and of course, swimming. As for amenities, Madison Blue Spring State Park provides picnic pavilions, as well as being a pet friendly park. This state park is a place where anyone can come and have a great time, In fact, it was voted #1 swimming hole in the country in 2015!

Manatee Springs State Park is located in the northwestern part of Florida's peninsula, and is the sight of one of Florida's 33 first magnitude springs, with an average water flow between 50 and 150 million gallons of water per day. It is a great place to gaze at the beautiful wildlife, especially the park's namesake, the manatee (when the water is cold enough). The park also offers paddling, bicycling, tubing, and even event catering thanks to Anderson's Outdoor Adventures. And some of the park's most alluring features are the underwater caverns available to certified cave divers looking for a beautiful, maze-like adventure. But if you aren't certified, fret not, because the park has everything from camping and picnicking to snorkeling and fishing, as well as an 800 ft. boardwalk and over 8 miles of hiking trails. Park rangers are on sight to provide additional support and information in order to make Manatee Springs State Park a truly wonderful experience. 

Born from an incomplete barge canal that would have connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico through northern Florida, the Marjorie Harris Carr Cross Florida Greenway is now a protected greenway with diverse wildlife and a multi-use trail that spans 300 miles.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park dates back to the 1930's when Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings lived in a community called Cross Creek. It was in this home that she wrote her novel The Yearling which won a Pullitzer Prize. Guests visiting can explore the farm, walk a trail in the wooded area, view the preserved gardens and groves, or take part in a guided tour of the home. Adjacent to the farm, there is a county park where picnic tables, a playground, and a boat ramp to Orange Lake are all available. This Historic State Park is great for families or anyone looking to learn about Florida history.

Mike Roess Gold Head Branch State Park was created by the Civilians Conservation Corps in the 1930's. The park contains one of the last remaining examples of an old growth stand of longleaf pines. Its marshes and lakes provide habitats to various forms of animals which make the park a great destination for wildlife viewing. Visitors can hike the Florida National Scenic Trail, or they can swim, canoe, or fish in Lake Johnson. There are picnic areas for families to enjoy the day and designated camping grounds to spend the night. 

Mound Key Archeological Park is situated in a forest of mangrove trees only accessible by watercraft from Lovers Key State Park or Koreshan State Park. The site is known for shell mounds built by the Calusa Native Americans which can reach more than 30ft high.

The Myakka River State Park is a beautiful park with more amenities and activities than most other parks in Florida. Visitors can take advantage of the Myakka River by fishing, boating, and paddling. Likewise, visitors can also camp on site and use the laundry, shower station, picnic pavilion, campfire circles, and more. 

Found in Tallahassee, Natural Bridge Battlefield Historic State Park is the site of the second largest Civil War battle in Florida. A monument located at the park honors the Confederate soldiers who defended Natural Bridge. There are picnic tables available as well as fishing areas surrounded by nature for visitors to relax and enjoy the historical beauty of the park.

At North Peninsula State Park you can enjoy an afternoon at the beach, swimming in the Atlantic Ocean or searching for wildlife such as sea turtles or an array of fish. Almost at 3 miles long, North Peninsula State Park offers picnic pavillians and a two mile long hike where visitors can see creatures such as indigo snakes and gopher tortoises. Whether you're looking for a nice relaxing trail, or to just bask in the sun, North Peninsula State Park is a perfect family beach spot.

There is plenty of things to keep you entertained at O'Leno State Park. Some of its amenities include campfire circles, kayak launches, an amphitheater, museum, and playground. There are a few trails to go hiking or biking on as well, and if you would like to experience all of the fun at O'Leno, you can spend the night on the campgrounds! The park is filled with breathtaking views and wildlife, containing eighteen natural communities, which makes it one of the most diverse state parks in all of Florida.

Welcome to Ochlockonee River State Park! A great place to spend a day, weekend, or week long vacation. Enjoy fishing in the park's river for both freshwater and saltwater fish such as bream, largemouth bass, and catfish. The boat ramp allows easy access to the water for anyone who wants to canoe or kayak. Picnic and swimming areas are available for visitors at the intersection of the Ochlockonee River and the Dead River. Blissfully hike through the trails and marvel at the various wildlife families that live there. For visitors who plan on staying the night, full access to campgrounds with restrooms and showers are available. 

The Okeechobee Battlefield Historic State Park boasts quite a history. A battle occurred on site of this state park during the second Seminole War. Now, visitors come to look at the historic property, watch wildlife, and eat at the picnic pavilion.

Oleta River State Park is located in 30 minutes from Downtown Miami. It is Florida's largest urban park, here you can enjoy a great deal of activities, there's something for everyone. Oleta River State Park has over 10 miles of mountain bike trails for those who are at an intermediate level. Other activities that Oleta River State Park offers include camping, paddling, fishing, hiking, picnicking, and swimming. Some of the amenities include cabins, beach, gardens, and picnic pavilions.

Olustee Battle Field Historic State Park is the site of Florida's largest Civil War battle that took place in 1864. Olustee Battle Field has a visitor center that contains historical information and artifacts about the war and the site. A reenactment is held every February at the park. Visitors can relax at the picnic pavillion or take a walk along a mile long trail that has signs describing the events of the battle.

Overlooking the Apalachicola River is a beautiful home built by Thomas Orman for all sorts of gatherings in 1838. The rich history behind the Orman House Historic State Park aided in shaping Florida. Travel back in time and take a tour of the home, or visit the Chapman Botanical Gardens, which is always blooming in remembrance of one of the most popular botanists, Dr. Alvan Chapman. Experience the interpretive exhibits and nature trails, and find out everything that this state park has to offer.

Oscar Scherer State Park is located between Sarasota and Venice on the West Coast of Florida and features a wide array of experiences and amenities. The park is a 1400-acre sanctuary to local wildlife, as it is surrounded by highways and housing developments. Referred to as one of Florida's hidden gems, 15 miles of hiking trails allow visitors to encounter the park's wildlife such as bald eagles, bobcats, North American river otters, alligators, gopher tortoises, and - most notably - the Florida Scrub Jay.  The Florida Scrub Jay is endemic to Florida, meaning it is found no where else on the planet and requires the unique features of Florida scrub habitats in order to survive. This curious bird attracts thousands of visitors each year, with the park even offering 'Sunday Scrub Jay Walks'. Other amenities such as canoeing, biking, camping, hiking, snorkeling, and even wedding services are offered at the park.

The Palatka to St. Augustine Trail is a beautiful stretch of land that connects both St. Johns and Putnum counties. This 12-foot wide, 19 mile long trailed is nicely paved and is full of agricultural landscapes and scenic routes. There are a number of access locations but the most popular tends to be starting in St. Johns and ending at Putnum, most likely due to the abundance of parking available at the eastern trailheads. In addition, you also get the opportunity to visit The Florida Trail Town of Palatka mid travels. This trail is not to be missed. Happy Trails! 

Palatka-to-Lake Butler State Trail is located in one of the most beautiful areas of the state. This trail extends 47 miles, and it's opened 365 days a year. It offers four miles of paved asphalt for bicycling and approximately 19 miles of paved asphalt. It's also pet friendly and has a playground. Be sure to check out this beautiful trail for a day full of fun and nature!

Paynes Creek Historical State Park was built on the site of a destroyed settler's outpost from 1849. Visitors enjoy scenic nature trails with opportunities such as canoeing, kayaking, and fishing from the creek! Also, visit the museum at the visitor's center to gain insight into the daily lives of the Native Americans and settlers that once occupied the land.

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park offers an amphitheater, shower stations, a playground, and campfire circles, among other amenities. Bicycling, hiking, fishing, and geo-seeking are some of the activities for guests to take part in while at the park. 

Perdido Key State Park is a popular destination for swimmers in Florida. The white sand beaches and dunes covered with sea oats give it a gorgeous sight. The beaches can be accessed through the boardwalks from the parking lot, allowing for the preservation of the delicate dunes and vegetation. There are picnic tables for families, and a collection of endangered and threatened species to view. Surf fishing is a must-try activity at Perdido Key. It is popular among the locals and all skill levels are welcomed. 

Ponce de Leon Springs State Park is named for Juan Ponce de León, the Spanish explorer who led the first expedition to Florida in 1513 on a quest to find the "fountain of youth.” Many come to visit the parks large natural springs, citing it as have healing and refreshing effects. The main spring, a convergence of two underground bodies of water, produces 14 million gallons of water daily and maintains a temperature of 68° year round. The park also offers two nature trails that guide visitors through a longleaf pine habitat, home to florida wildlife such as manatees, alligators, white tailed deer, otters, and bald eagles. Picnicking, swimming, and hiking are amongst the most popular activities at the park. It is also home to the Old Spanish Sugar Mill, a popular attraction to both tourists and locals, where guests buy the batter and topping to cook their own pancakes right on their dining table! De Leon Springs offers a rich history and is sure to be an amazing experience for the whole family, whether you’re from out of town or just down the road.

Price's Scrub State Park stretches 1000 acres across the Northwest Marion Greenway. The park is known for its lush green landscape and mile long trails for walking and hiking. The park features picnic tables, spacious grass areas, restrooms, and a watering trough. An equestrian trail is available for horseback riding as well as a 9 mile trail, great for bicycling. Whether you want to be active and take a jog, or sit back enjoy the green landscape and bird watch, Price's Scrub State Park has a little something that everyone can enjoy.

Journey through expansive pine Flatwoods and visit the homes of Pumpkin Hill Preserve State Park's prolific wildlife from alligators to wood storks. Its 15-mile trail accommodates hikers, off-road bikers, and equestrians while offering two fishing spots.

A state park with one of Florida's largest springs, pumping out water at a rate of 400 million gallons per day. With up to 18 feet of depth and crystal clear, blue waters, snorkelers have a great opportunity to experience the bountiful wildlife that inhabit the springs. Additionally, hiking, kayaking, tubing, and camping are popular activities at this park with 10,000 years of history, abundant with lush gardens, waterfalls, and scenic views.

Ravine Gardens State Park is known for its steephead ravines that are caused by a spring-fed creek that never dries up. The ravines have widened over the years and were turned into a beautiful garden. Visitors can see the garden and all its glory from a 1.8 mile long paved road, enjoying photo stops and parking areas along the way. Picnic tables, large covered pavillions, and auditoriums are also available. The garden is most known for its beautiful azaleas which are best to see during the Florida winter months. 

River Rise Preserve State Park is surrounded by a wooded area and many tall trees. It's the perfect spot for equestrians and bicyclists looking to explore over 35 miles of trails. Anglers can enjoy their time fishing in part of the Santa Fe River. Then when the day is done, there is plenty of room on site for guests and their horses to camp overnight. There's even campfire circles, picnic pavilions, interpretive exhibits, and a bathhouse for your enjoyment and convenience. It is filled with breathtaking scenery just waiting to be discovered, and it is quite the natural and quiet getaway.

Rock Springs Run State Park is one of the many valuable sand pine scrub and flatwood pine habitat reserves that many endemic and endangered species call home. With over 17 miles of trails available for exploration, visitors can enjoy bicycling, hiking, or even horseback riding through this unique ecosystem. The park offers guided trail rides as well as horse rentals for individuals or groups of up to 30 people. Campsites are available throughout the park, some of which are only accessible via canoe or horseback. The park does allow hunting during the months of September through January, during which times some trails will be closed to ensure the safety of visitors. There are also several springs and rivers that cut through the park, offering guests the chance to cool off and go swimming. Canoeing and tubing are also offered at the park, creating countless opportunities to explore and have fun for families, friends, and individual visitors alike.

Home to one of the top 10 Trophy Bass Lakes in Florida, Rodman Campground is an ideal family camping ground that, in addition to fishing, facilitates biking, bird-watching, boating, picnicking, and wildlife viewing. Expect to observe bald eagles, waterfowl, and wading birds as well as alligators, turtles, and the occasional manatee.

The Rodman Dam Recreation Area was born from the remnants of the Rodman Dam, and now the upstream portion of this former earthen dam has become the perfect spot for bank fishing bass, bream, catfish, and muller. Other activities permitted at this location include boating and bird watching.

The Ross Prairie Trailhead & Campground allows guests to hike, camp, horseback ride, and picnic. Some of amenities on site include restroom facilities, campgrounds, and a picnic pavilion. 

What better way to cool off on a hot day than by stopping by Ruth B. Kirby Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park!  Some of the onsite springs include Gilchrist Blue, Little Blue Spring, Naked Spring, Kiefer Spring, and Johnson Spring. The main spring is known for it's support of wildlife. However, the springs aren't all the park has to offer, Ruth B. Kirby Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park offers paddling, snorkeling, and swimming. 

San Felasco Hammock Preserve State Park is known for being one of Florida's best kept secret hiking spots. This state park is also one of the largest remaining hardwood forests in Florida. Along side the hiking trails, San Felasco also has perfect views for birdwatching, the best off road biking, and historical sites available for viewing. Featuring picnic tables and scenic views, this is the perfect spot for a family outing or enjoying some of Florida's natural beauty. 

San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park is boasted for its rich history. Its museum has displays for some of the tools unearthed beside the fort, as well as a self-guided interpretive exhibits through the park. There are picnic pavilions and grills available overlooking the Wakulla River and Apalache Bay from Tucker's Point, where fresh and salt water come together. It has become an excellent fishing spot for anglers! Come learn about this historic site and take a walk on one of the nature trails that are just waiting to be explored.

Santos Trailhead and Campground has the best mountain biking experience in Florida! 80 miles of single-track bike trails for all levels of experience. There are built "wooden" features and a Vortex Freeride area built in a former limerock quarry that provide extreme terrains in Florida's flatlands. There are several bike stops along the trails for bike repairs, or refreshments, as well as picnic pavilions, bike wash stations, and restrooms at the top of the track to rest and recoup for the riders. Santos Trailhead and Campground also offers other trails and camping areas leading into the Ocala National Forest. Whether you are looking for a place to take your mountain bike, or just a scenic family outing, the Trailhead and Campground has something for everyone. 

There are quite a few amenities and activities to enjoy at the Savannas Preserve State Park like horseback riding, canoeing or kayaking, bicycling, and fishing. There are different nature trails, launches, interpretive exhibits, and picnic pavilions. The Environmental Education Center even provides interactive programs and special classes that are available to people of all ages to learn more about the history and culture of the state park.

The habitats in Seabranch Preserve State Park were formed by ancient oceans over the course of many years. Rare sand pine scrub, baygall communities, a mangrove swamp, and scrubby flatwoods can be seen by the visitors all within a mile from each other. A trail that extends for over 4 miles is available for visitors to hike and witness all of the wildlife that Seabranch Preserve State Park has to offer. Picnic areas are also available for visitors. There are future plans to develop this park in order to make it more enticing to visitors. 

The Seabranch Preserve State Park, located in Stuart Florida, provides experiences such as hiking, geoseeking, mountain biking, birding, and more. There is an interpretive exhibit and picnic pavilion on site, among other amenities.

 

At Sebastion Inlet State Park, you can spend your well-deserved day in the sun - camping, fishing, swimming, shell collecting, observing nature, kayaking, and more! For those seeking to cool off with an indoor experience, there are two museums nearby detailing the history of the surrounding area.

Bike, hike, or horse-back ride and then pop a tent at the Shangri-La Trailhead and Campground! The campgrounds are available year-round - walk amongst tall pines and oaks, following in the steps of the local inhabitants such as whitetail deer and bobcats.

Come for the famous glass-bottom boat rides and explore the submerged ecosystem of one of the largest springs in Florida at Silver Springs State Park - a popular major destination dating back to when guests would arrive by steamship.

The Skyway Fishing Pier State Park is home to a grand bridge that spans over Tampa Bay from St. Petersburg to Sarasota providing around the clock fishing for snook, tarpon, group, black sea bass, Spanish Mackeral, and more. Famished? Nearby vendors will supply you with snacks and drinks!

Located in Panama City Beach Florida, St. Andrews State Park is a beautiful state park with a mile-and-a-half of pristine beach. Some of its experiences and amenities include biking, boat tours, boating, camping, paddling, fishing, geo-seeking, hiking, picnicking, and many more fun activities!

St. Lucie Inlet Preserve State Park is a barrier island that is only accessible by boat. Visitors enjoy the boardwalk that takes them through the mangrove forests and hammocks of live oaks, cabbage palms, paradise trees, and wild limes. One can find animals such as loggerheads, leatherback, and green turtles. Some of the popular activities at St. Lucie Inlet Preserve State Park include swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, surf fishing, and picnicking. 

St. Marks River Preserve State Park is a hiking and equestrian trail located off of Tram Rd in Tallahassee. The park is ideal for wildlife viewing, with an array of animals in the air and on the ground, ranging from small critters like opossum, to larger beings such as deer, black bear, or bobcat. The park is free to enter and great for those looking to roam and tour the beautiful scenery. 

The St. Sebastian River Preserve State Park in Fellsmere is a great spot to go kayaking. You can even bring your pets! Some of the amenities on site include a boat ramp, canoe kayak launch, equestrian trails, and a visitor center.

Named after the American composer Stephen Foster, Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park is situated by the banks of the Suwannee River. It has a museum with exhibits that feature many of Foster's songs, and the park itself plays some of his songs throughout the day from the 97-bell carillon. Demonstrations in quilting, blacksmithing, stained glass making, and many others are available for visitors to watch in Craft Square. Other Popular activities include hiking, bicycling, wildlife viewing, canoeing/kayaking, and picnicking. A campsite is offered for visitors who want to spend the night. The Florida Folk Festival is hosted every memorial day weekend at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center. Other special events, such as concerts and weekend retreats, are also held throughout the year. 

Suwannee River State Park is a historic site, known today for its ghost town ruins and the remnants of a 19th-century steamship that are lost in time in this great hiking destination at the junction of the Suwannee and Withlacoochee Rivers. The park is a great place to host weddings or parties and has five vacation cabins available for rent. They also have a full facility campground, allowing all levels of accommodations from tents to RVs. Boating, paddling, fishing, and hiking are great activities at this historic park. 

This beautiful and historic 16-mile stretch of converted railway connects Florida's capital to the Gulf of Mexico. The paved trail provides an amazing scenic experience for running, walking, biking, and skating. Equestrian riders can also enjoy the adjacent unpaved trail. Along the path you will encounter all kinds of wildlife such as beautiful cypress trees, butterflies, wading birds, and on occasion alligators and manatees. 

St. Marks Historic State Trail is also pet friendly and provides many great locations for picnics with multiple pavilions and playgrounds for families to enjoy. 

At the southern entrance of the trail, the coastal city of St. Marks welcomes hikers to enjoy seafood dining, fishing, and entertainment. The northern entrance connects hikers to trails leading directly to Apalachicola National Forest to experience even more relaxing scenery and wildlife.

Tarkiln Bayou Preserve State Park is a 4,000 acre preserve that offers a variety of things to do and see. With over 100 rare plant and animal species including the alligator snapping turtle, sweet pitcher plant, and Chapman's butterwart, this is an ideal spot for birdwatching, fishing, and Geo-seeking on the trails.

While at the preserve bring your pets and kids for a family day out. Have a picnic at their picnic pavilion, bring your bike for a ride on the mountain bike trail, or take a walk down the nature trail. Make a day of it with a day hike to Perdido Bay.

Tarkiln Bayou Preserve State Park also offers an interpretive exhibit to learn more about the preserve and its inhabitants, including the four species of endangered pitch plants and other rare or endangered plant species.

 

A 2,000 acre preserve undergoing habitat restoration, full of mangroves, saltwater and freshwater wetlands, and uplands communities. The primary activity at the park is kayaking, but hiking is also available at this historic site. 

The Barnacle Historic State Park is a house that was built in 1891, which dates back to the times when the way to and from Miami was by boat. The house is located on the shore of Biscayne Bay, and it was home to a man named Ralph Middleton Munroe, who preserved the forest on the land. A visit to this park consists of a tour around the historic property, picnics on the lawn, setting up hammocks, walking one's dog, or just relaxing on the estate and watching the boats sail by. 

Come boat, camp, and fish where the Chattahoochee and Flint River converge into Lake Seminole, the source of the Apalachicola River. Three Rivers State Park is the perfect place to spend the day picnicking or observing wildlife, and at night you can camp under the stars or snooze in a reserved cabin!

Weeki Wache Springs State Park includes Florida's only spring-fed water park with cool 72-degree water. Approximately 45 minutes north of Tampa, this State Park includes Buccaneer Bay, with an all natural lazy river, a children's play area, water slides that go into the spring, and a mermaid show. 

Boggy Creek Airboat Adventures offers several different types of airboat tours. Visitors can see natural wildlife, including alligators. There are night tours, day tours, and an option to drive your own airboat. 

Welcome to T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. This state park is 20 miles full of white sand beaches, dunes, marsh, and wildlife. A self-proclaimed "wildlife haven," T.H. Stone Memorial is home to three species of sea turtles, the endangered St. Andrews beach mouse, and many beach nesting birds, including the snowy plover. A trip to this state park is a perfect opportunity to go bird watching or simply to observe the park's wildlife. Bobcats, otters, deer, and armadillos are among the many animals you can catch a glimpse of. 

A beautiful view of the beach at T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park